20th Capra Meeting on Radiation Reaction in General Relativity

June 19, 2017

The Capra meetings have been bringing together relativists interested in the problem of radiation reaction in general relativity and its application to extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. The meeting will be held June 19-23, 2017 at UNC.

Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science

April 10, 2017

Prof. Daniel Kleppner from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and recipient of the 2017 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research, will present a talk entitled “Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science.”

A new field of quantum science has sprung into life in the last few decades. This talk will describe three of the scientific seeds that contributed to this flowering.

A reception will be held outside of Chapman 201 after the colloquium.

 

Flyer available here.

20th Capra Meeting on Radiation Reaction in General Relativity

March 31, 2017

The Capra meetings have brough together relativists interested in the problem of radiation reaction in general relativity and its application to extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. This year’s meeting will be held June 19-23, 2017 at UNC.

Daniel Kleppner Colloquium

March 31, 2017

Prof. Daniel Kleppner from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and recipient of the 2017 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research, will present a talk entitled “Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science,” April 10 at 2pm.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

November 1, 2016

Dr John Lattanzio, from the Centre for Astrophysics School of Physics and Astronomy at Monash University in Clayton, Australia, will give a talk entitled “Has Kepler Found Aliens?”

The Kepler spacecraft has revolutionized the search for exo-planets, and provided aster seismology data for thousands of stars. But it probably gathered more publicity from observations of one single star. This star does not look like anything predicted – with one exception: it looks very much like predictions made for the signature of alien megastructures around a star. In this talk I review the Kepler data for this star, and look at possible explanations.

A reception will be held in the ground floor lobby of Chapman at 5pm.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

October 29, 2016

Prof. John Lattanzio, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, will give a colloquium about data from the Kepler spacecraft.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

Abstract:  The Kepler spacecraft has revolutionized the search for exo-planets and provided asteroseismology data for thousands of stars. But it probably gathered more publicity from observations of one single star. This star does not look like anything predicted – with one exception: It looks very much like predictions made for the signature alien megastructures around a star. In this talk I review the Kepler data for this star and look at possible explanations.

See flyer here

A Light refreshments will be served on the 3rd floor of Chapman from 3:30pm.

Colloquium at 4pm in Chapman Hall 125.

A reception will be held at 5pm outside of Chapman Hall 125.

CoSMS Workshop on Naturalness

October 21, 2016

This 3 Day CoSMS workshop centers on Theoretical and Experimental constraints on Naturalness, the main driver for physics beyond the Standard Model for many years. The next few years are expected to be especially informative.

More information and registration available at: http://wasabi.physics.unc.edu/indico/event/2/overview

CoSMS Workshop on Naturalness

August 11, 2016

This 3-day CoSMS workshop centers on Theoretical and Experimental constraints on Naturalness, the main driver for physics beyond the Standard Model for many years. The next few years are expected to be especially informative.

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

July 18, 2016

Dr Mark Hannam, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University, will give a talk on Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy.

See flyer here

This talk follows a UNC Astrophysics lecture by Dr. Subinoy Das of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, “Astrophysical Small Scale Signatures of Non-WIMP Dark Matter” in 277 from 3-4pm.

A reception will be held at 5pm in Phillips 277.

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

July 14, 2016

Prof. Mark Hannam, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University, will give a talk on

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

Abstract:  Gravitational waves have been directly detected for the first time, from the collision of two black holes. Measuring the properties of the black holes (their masses and spins) required theoretical models of the signal, calculated by combining analytic approximation techniques with numerical solutions of the full Einstein equations for the last orbits and merger. I will discuss how the models were produced that were used in measuring the properties of the first black-hole-binary observed, and the challenges ahead as we enter the era of gravitational wave astronomy.

See flyer here

This talk follows a UNC Astrophysics lecture by Dr. Subinoy Das of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, “Astrophysical Small Scale Signatures of Non-WIMP Dark Matter” in 277 from 3-4pm.

A reception will be held at 5pm in Phillips 277.