Carolina Science Café series: String Theory & the Substructure of Matter

February 7, 2018

Dr. Louise Dolan, CoSMS member and UNC’s Kenan Distinguished Professor of Physics, will discuss elementary particles, gravity, and how to understand the Universe, kicking off the 2018 Carolina Science Café series.

Wednesday, February 7, 6pm

BackBar at Top of the Hill Restaurant

100 E Franklin St, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

Downtown Chapel Hill, North Carolina

To learn more about Dr. Dolan, please see her webpage.


Free appetizers while supplies last courtesy of the series’ sponsor, the UNC-CH Chapter of Sigma Xi.

Astronomy on Tap: The Beginning and End of the Universe

February 6, 2018

The first Astronomy on Tap event of 2018 at Fullsteam Brewery in Durham is focused on cosmology and the beginning and end of our Universe and led by 2 CoSMS members.

  • Dr. Adrienne Erickcek (UNC-CH) will discuss the hot big bang and our expanding Universe.
  • Dr. Katie Mack (NCSU) (http://www.astrokatie.com/) will talk about the future of the cosmos and how the Universe will likely come to an end. She also has a very large following on social media: https://twitter.com/AstroKatie

Astronomy on Tap events are meant to provide a venue for short outreach talks (~20 min with plenty of time for questions) in a relaxed setting over beers — they are free, open to all ages, and start at 7 pm. Some more details about the event can be found at the link here:

https://astronomyontap.org/2018/01/astronomy-on-tap-triangle-5-tue-feb-6-2017/

String Theory/Nature of the Universe Colloquium

December 1, 2017

Clifford Johnson is a high energy physics professor at the University of Southern California and is releasing a non-fiction science graphic novel about the nature of the universe in the fall of 2017. The date is still tentative and details about his talk will follow.

Clifford Johnson Public Lecture

August 17, 2017

Clifford Johnson is a high energy physics professor at the University of Southern California and is releasing a non-fiction science graphic novel about the nature of the universe in the fall of 2017. More details about his upcoming talk will follow.

 

 

20th Capra Meeting on Radiation Reaction in General Relativity

June 19, 2017

The Capra meetings have been bringing together relativists interested in the problem of radiation reaction in general relativity and its application to extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. The meeting will be held June 19-23, 2017 at UNC.

Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science

April 10, 2017

Prof. Daniel Kleppner from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and recipient of the 2017 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research, will present a talk entitled “Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science.”

A new field of quantum science has sprung into life in the last few decades. This talk will describe three of the scientific seeds that contributed to this flowering.

A reception will be held outside of Chapman 201 after the colloquium.

 

Flyer available here.

20th Capra Meeting on Radiation Reaction in General Relativity

March 31, 2017

The Capra meetings have brough together relativists interested in the problem of radiation reaction in general relativity and its application to extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. This year’s meeting will be held June 19-23, 2017 at UNC.

Daniel Kleppner Colloquium

March 31, 2017

Prof. Daniel Kleppner from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and recipient of the 2017 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research, will present a talk entitled “Three Seeds in the Flowering of Quantum Science,” April 10 at 2pm.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

November 1, 2016

Dr John Lattanzio, from the Centre for Astrophysics School of Physics and Astronomy at Monash University in Clayton, Australia, will give a talk entitled “Has Kepler Found Aliens?”

The Kepler spacecraft has revolutionized the search for exo-planets, and provided aster seismology data for thousands of stars. But it probably gathered more publicity from observations of one single star. This star does not look like anything predicted – with one exception: it looks very much like predictions made for the signature of alien megastructures around a star. In this talk I review the Kepler data for this star, and look at possible explanations.

A reception will be held in the ground floor lobby of Chapman at 5pm.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

October 29, 2016

Prof. John Lattanzio, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, will give a colloquium about data from the Kepler spacecraft.

Has Kepler Found Aliens?

Abstract:  The Kepler spacecraft has revolutionized the search for exo-planets and provided asteroseismology data for thousands of stars. But it probably gathered more publicity from observations of one single star. This star does not look like anything predicted – with one exception: It looks very much like predictions made for the signature alien megastructures around a star. In this talk I review the Kepler data for this star and look at possible explanations.

See flyer here

A Light refreshments will be served on the 3rd floor of Chapman from 3:30pm.

Colloquium at 4pm in Chapman Hall 125.

A reception will be held at 5pm outside of Chapman Hall 125.