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CoSMS Workshop on Naturalness

October 21, 2016

This 3 Day CoSMS workshop centers on Theoretical and Experimental constraints on Naturalness, the main driver for physics beyond the Standard Model for many years. The next few years are expected to be especially informative.

More information and registration available at: http://wasabi.physics.unc.edu/indico/event/2/overview

CoSMS Workshop on Naturalness

August 11, 2016

This 3-day CoSMS workshop centers on Theoretical and Experimental constraints on Naturalness, the main driver for physics beyond the Standard Model for many years. The next few years are expected to be especially informative.

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

July 18, 2016

Dr Mark Hannam, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University, will give a talk on Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy.

See flyer here

This talk follows a UNC Astrophysics lecture by Dr. Subinoy Das of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, “Astrophysical Small Scale Signatures of Non-WIMP Dark Matter” in 277 from 3-4pm.

A reception will be held at 5pm in Phillips 277.

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

July 14, 2016

Prof. Mark Hannam, from the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University, will give a talk on

Numerical Relativity and the Future of Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

Abstract:  Gravitational waves have been directly detected for the first time, from the collision of two black holes. Measuring the properties of the black holes (their masses and spins) required theoretical models of the signal, calculated by combining analytic approximation techniques with numerical solutions of the full Einstein equations for the last orbits and merger. I will discuss how the models were produced that were used in measuring the properties of the first black-hole-binary observed, and the challenges ahead as we enter the era of gravitational wave astronomy.

See flyer here

This talk follows a UNC Astrophysics lecture by Dr. Subinoy Das of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, “Astrophysical Small Scale Signatures of Non-WIMP Dark Matter” in 277 from 3-4pm.

A reception will be held at 5pm in Phillips 277.

CoSMS Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

April 27, 2016

Cosmic phenomena, including the origin of the universe, stellar explosions on the surface of white dwarfs, and the evolution of our galaxy, cannot be understood without a proper knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates. This CoSMS workshop is designed to build a bridge between these phenomena (big bang, classical novae, and globular clusters) and their underlying nuclear physics processes. We will pursue two specific goals: first, to initiate a new program of computing new stellar models for novae that could impact the evolution of globular clusters; second, to build a significantly improved foundation for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates. Presentations will be given by selected faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students. A poster session will accompany the scientific program.

Please contact cosms@unc.edu for registration and presentation information.

See workshop flyer for additional information.

CoSMS Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

April 22, 2016

Chapel Hill, April 27, 2016; Great Room at Top of the Hill

Cosmic phenomena, including the origin of the universe, stellar explosions on the surface of white dwarfs, and the evolution of our galaxy, cannot be understood without a proper knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates. This CoSMS workshop is designed tCoSMSworkshopo build a bridge between these phenomena (big bang, classical novae, and globular clusters) and their underlying nuclear physics processes. We will pursue two specific goals: first, to initiate a new program of computing new stellar models for novae that could impact the evolution of globular clusters; second, to build a significantly improved foundation for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates. Presentations will be given by selected faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students. A poster session will accompany the scientific program.

 

Organizing Committee
Christian Iliadis (UNC and TUNL)
Richard Longland (NCSU and TUNL)
Jordi Jose (Barcelona)
Alain Coc (Orsay)

Classical Novae And The Physics Of Exploding Stars

April 21, 2016

Prof. Jordi José

Department of Physics, Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona

 

 

Abstract: At the turn of the 21st Century, new tools and developments, at the crossroads of theoretical and computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuScreen Shot 2016-04-21 at 8.03.05 PMclear physics, have revolutionized our understanding of the physics of stellar explosions. The use of space-borne observatories has opened new windows to study the cosmos through multifrequency observations. In parallel to the elemental stellar abundances inferred spectroscopically, cosmochemists are now providing isotopic abundance ratios from micron-sized presolar grains extracted from meteorites. Encapsulated in those grains is pristine information about the suite of nuclear processes that took place in their stellar progenitors. The dawn of supercomputing has also provided astrophysicists withe appropriate tools to study complex physical phenomena that require a multidimensional approach. Last but not least, nuclear physicists have developed new techniques to determine nuclear interactions close to stellar energies. In this talk, a number of breakthroughs from all these different disciplines will be presented, with emphasis on the physical mechanisms that operate during nova explosions.

Classical Novae And The Physics Of Exploding Stars

April 21, 2016

Abstract: At the turn of the 21st Century, new tools and developments, at the crossroads of theoretical and computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuScreen Shot 2016-04-21 at 8.03.05 PMclear physics, have revolutionized our understanding of the physics of stellar explosions. The use of space-borne observatories has opened new windows to study the cosmos through multifrequency observations. In parallel to the elemental stellar abundances inferred spectroscopically, cosmochemists are now providing isotopic abundance ratios from micron-sized presolar grains extracted from meteorites. Encapsulated in those grains is pristine information about the suite of nuclear processes that took place in their stellar progenitors. The dawn of supercomputing has also provided astrophysicists withe appropriate tools to study complex physical phenomena that require a multidimensional approach. Last but not least, nuclear physicists have developed new techniques to determine nuclear interactions close to stellar energies. In this talk, a number of breakthroughs from all these different disciplines will be presented, with emphasis on the physical mechanisms that operate during nova explosions.

“AWAKE: A Novel Acceleration Technology Based on Plasmas” Dr. Allen Caldwell

March 24, 2016

Abstract: New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future of high energy particle physics. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. An experimental program has started at CERN, the AWAKE experiment, where proton bunches will be used for the first time ever to drive plasma wakefields. The information gained from this suite of experiments will provide the basis for designing next-generation accelerators. In the presentation, the ideas behind plasma wakefield acceleration will be explained, as well as the pros and cons of different approaches. The goals and status of the AWAKE experiment will then be described.

AWAKE Colloquium

AWAKE: A Novel Acceleration Technology Based on Plasmas Colloquium

March 21, 2016

Prof. Allen Caldwell will visit CoSMS from the Max-Planck Physics Institute in Munich to discuss the Advanced Wakefield Experiment (AWAKE).

Abstract:  New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future of high energy particle physics. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. An experimental program has started at CERN, the AWAKE experiment, where proton bunches will be used for the first time ever to drive plasma wakefields. The information gained from this suite of experiments will provide the basis for designing next-generation accelerators. In the presentation, the ideas behind plasma wakefield acceleration will be explained, as well as the pros and cons of different approaches. The goals and status of the AWAKE experiment will then be described.

Please see the flyer here.